Calm it Kermit
miss-catastrofes-naturales:

Eli Craven
Screen Lovers Series +

miss-catastrofes-naturales:

Eli Craven

Screen Lovers Series +

 

lespetroleuses:

Brigitte Bardot in Cannes, 1953

And here is why I love Bardot, people.

ornamentalboxes:

bye house you served us well and then murdered us with filth grime and madness, but we will probably forgive you

The Tat in the Hat

I’m a total Marmite actor, you either love what I do or hate it. I’ve done it all: incest, matricide, plenty of gay roles, paedophillia… Although I’m not sure I should really be joking about those things – I’m a bit worried it won’t come across all that well. I read on a blog once: “Eddie Redmayne either does period dramas or plays American f***-ups”.

delphineeskimopie:

Alison Hendrix dancing on things / on places she shouldn’t be (inspired by x)

Harry Potter at the end of every school year: I came to have a good time and I'm honestly feeling so attacked right now
it-used-to-be-fun:


My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.” 

Bella Naija, 2014 (x)

it-used-to-be-fun:

My family is from Nigeria, and my full name is Uzoamaka, which means “The road is good.” Quick lesson: My tribe is Igbo, and you name your kid something that tells your history and hopefully predicts your future. So anyway, in grade school, because my last name started with an A, I was the first in roll call, and nobody ever knew how to pronounce it. So I went home and asked my mother if I could be called Zoe. I remember she was cooking, and in her Nigerian accent she said, “Why?” I said, “Nobody can pronounce it.” Without missing a beat, she said, “If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka.” 

Bella Naija, 2014 (x)

I’m scared that I’m not myself in here, and I’m scared that I am.